BARCELONA ZEROG CHALLENGE 2016

BARCELONA ZEROG CHALLENGE 2016

We are back again with another parabolic flight opportunity to experiment in microgravity!
The competition challenges young students’ teams of 2-3 people (maximum) between the ages of 18-35 in the space sector to submit proposals for experiments to be conducted in a zero-G environment. Undergraduate, Master and PhD students from any part of the world are encouraged to apply. The top team with the best proposal, endorsed by an academic professor will actually get to fly in zero-G to test their experiments. Flights with a certified aerobatic plane will be conducted at the Sabadell Airport (30 minutes drive from Barcelona, Spain) and media will be present to cover the event. Diverse, international and intercultural teams are most welcome.  The projects will be assessed by their: suitabilitiy, scientific merit, safety, mentor endorsement, international perspective and outreach planning.

ARE YOU READY TO FLY? DO YOU HAVE A ZEROG EXPERIMENT DESIGN?

** EXTENDED DEADLINE** 15th DECEMBER 2016

Submission and information: barcelona.zerog@gmail.com

Facebook group: Barcelona ZeroG Challenge 2016

AEROCLUBLOGO

ELGRA-logonew_blue

 

 

 

 

EXPERIMENT REQUIREMENTS : 

Maximum size of 50x 30x 30 cm. No moving parts outside. Maximum weight: 10kg.

Free-fall time: Up to 12 parabolas of 8 ZERO-G seconds each.

Should not need any external components or electric plugs. No hazardous materials. If liquids are present,

the equipment must be totally watertight. Experiments must be designed to be WEARABLE,

and will be safety checked before flight.

 

WHAT SHOULD YOU SUBMIT FIRST?

EXPERIMENT MANIFESTO

1. A 5-10 page proposal that includes:

  • Scientific or technical (if it is a demonstration) objectives
  • Experimental expected results both on earth and in flight.
  • Why ZeroG is needed?
  • A description of the experiment
  • How data will be processed and analysed
  • A brief summary of why the experiment is relevant

2. A brief résumé of each member on the team; diverse, international,

intercultural teams are highly encouraged

3. An endorsing letter from a professor or tutor from an academic institution.

Submit it electronically in a zip file to the contest address

barcelona.zerog@gmail.com

A confirmation reply will be sent.

PRE-SELECTED TEAMS THEN WILL BE THEN ASKED TO FILL

IN A DETAILED EXPERIMENT FORM FOR A FINAL SELECTION.

Frequently asked questions

Q: Will I be reimbursed for the construction of my experiment?

A: Participants are responsible for funding the construction and

design of their experiments.

Q: What is the allowed geometry/size of the experiment?

A: Maximum size of the experiment is 30x20x20 cm. There should be

no moving parts outside. The maximum weight is 10kg. There should be

no hazardous materials, and if liquids are present, the equipment

must be completely watertight.

Q: What are the interfaces to attach it to the zero-g airplane?

A: Experiments must be designed to be WEARABLE, as part of the

payload specialist’s clothing and will not be allowed to freely float

into the cockpit. They should be electrically autonomous.

Q: What is the exact duration?

A: The duration of free-fall is up to 10 parabolas of

up to 10 seconds each, for every flight participant.

Q: What is the g-profile during this duration?

A: The maximum g load is 3.5 g on pull-in and pull-out manoeuvres.

Real zero-g gravity between pull-in and pull-out.

Q: What kind of power and data acquisition units are available on board?

A: The experiment should not need any external components or electric plugs.

Q: Will there be travel and lodging provided?

A: Please note that lodging and travelling will be not sponsored.

Participants are responsible for lodging and travel to Spain,

and are encouraged to find sponsors for their experience.

Q: Are there any restrictions for who may apply?

A: Undergraduate, Master and PhD students from all over the

world are welcome, between 18-35 years of age. Team members

may be eligible to fly the experiment provided they have a currently

valid JAR/FAA Class II Medical Certificate. Final decision on whether

participants can accompany their experiments will be in hands of the pilot-in-command of the aerobatic plane.

Q: Who will be flying the aircraft?

A: The flight will be operated by Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell,

with an expert in zero-g parabolas aerobatic licensed pilot-in-command

and a payload specialist that will be on board of the aerobatic plane.

There is the possibility for the students to become the payload

specialist if they are interested. Medical and legal restrictions apply.

SELECTION PROCEDURE

Selection of the winning experiment will be objectively performed

by ELGRA members, leading experts in Low-Gravity research.

The European Low-Gravity Research Association (www.elgra.org)

is a leading research society in Europe which particularly

promotes the involvement of youngsters in space research.

Winning students will be encouraged to submit their results

to the ELGRA Symposium to take place in a city of Europe in 2015.

Results of this selection procedure will be final.

Aeronautical Medical  EASA Class II Certification required for flight

Please note that winning participants must obtain medical

documents (JAR, FAA Aeronautical Medical Class II Certificate or

any equivalent,  within the student’s country of origin) before flight,

that certify that they have no medical condition that impairs them

for flight. Medical certificates for flight crews are provided by

authorised medical examiners in every country where fight crew

regulations apply. Flight Certificates are only required if the

student wishes to fly the experiment. A medical check-out is

again required the weekend just before flight, by our own

Medical personnel. A certified Flight Surgeon from

SEMA (Spanish Society of Aeronautical Medicine) will supervise

the operations on-site. If the student does not pass the medical examination,

the winner team is still eligible for flying the experiment

(it will be flown by another qualified payload specialist from the organizing partners).

 

Legal disclaimer and other legal issues

Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell,

ELGRA, ESA Education or any other person taking part

in the organization of this competition are not legally

responsible for the activities involved with the contest,

nor are they responsible for damages to the experiments

or persons on board or to third parties.

A limited-terms civil insurance from

Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell, expert medical advice and a

mandatory pre-flight briefing will be  provided to all flight participants.

 

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BARCELONA ZEROG CHALLENGE 2014 WINNERS

We are proud the announce the winners of this year’s competition!!

The selection process was conducted via a strict scientific peer-review

of the submitted projects.

In this process the ESA EDUCATION OFFICE, ELGRA (European Low Gravity

Research Association) and a certified Flight Surgeon have reviewed the proposals.

The projects were assessed by their: suitabilitiy,

scientific merit, safety, endorsement, international perspective and outreach aspects.

 

BARCELONA ZEROG CHALLENGE 2014 WINNER TEAM: 


 

Valentina Boccia (Italy), Anja Schuster (Germany)

Project: Estimation of Relative Distance Between Two Objects In Microgravity Conditions

Mentor: Prof. Hugh Hill (International Space University).

 

ACCESIT (2nd prize):


 

Peter James Bruhn, Kasper A. Ørsted Andersen

and Johanne Østerby Sørensen (Denmark)

Project: Gravitational Physiology

Mentor: Lonnie Grove Petersen, MD (Univ. Copenhagen)

 

Congratulations to all of them!!

These teams are invited to conduct their proposed experiments

in parabolic flight in Barcelona within the Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell.

 

 

 

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BARCELONA AEROBATICS ZEROG CHALLENGE 3rd EDITION 2014

host the III Barcelona Zero-G Aerobatics Challenge.ELGRA (European Low-Gravity Research Association,

SGAC (Space Generation Advisory Council to the United Nations) and the

students’ association EUROAVIA are contributing partners.

UPDATE: ESA Education is also taking part in the Review process

of the submitted Experiments.

For more information on ESA Education activities please

visit its website:  http://www.esa.int/Education

ELGRA-logonew_blue

Competition overview
The competition challenges young students’

teams of 2-3 people (maximum)

sgacbetween the ages of 18-35

in the space sector to submit

proposals for

experiments to be conducted in a zero-G environment. Undergraduate,

Master and PhD students from any part of the world are encouraged to apply.

The top team with the best proposal will actually get to fly in zero-G to test

AEROCLUBLOGOtheir experiments.

Flights will be

conducted at the Sabadell Airport (30 minutes drive from

Barcelona, Spain) and media will be present to cover the event.

Diverse,  international and intercultural teams are most welcome.

Find more information here.

 

Deadlines and timeline

Experiment manifesto submission EXTENDED DEADLINE 15TH MARCH 2014
Intial selection decision (in this website): 1st May 2014
Final submission 15th May 2014
III Educational Barcelona ZeroG Flight Campaign: July  2014
Final reports due: October 2014

 

WHAT SHOULD YOU SUBMIT FIRST?

EXPERIMENT MANIFESTO

1. A 5-10 page proposal that includes:

  • Scientific or technical (if it is a demonstration) objectives
  • Experimental expected results both on earth and in flight.
  • Why ZeroG is needed?
  • A description of the experiment
  • How data will be processed and analysed
  • A brief summary of why the experiment is relevant

2. A brief résumé of each member on the team; diverse, international,

intercultural teams are highly encouraged

3. An endorsing letter from a professor or tutor from an academic institution.

Submit it electronically in a zip file to the coordinator’s address

antoni.perez-poch at upc.edu  . A confirmation reply will be sent.

PRE-SELECTED TEAMS THEN WILL BE THEN ASKED TO FILL

IN A DETAILED EXPERIMENT FORM FOR A FINAL SELECTION.

Frequently asked questions

Q: Will I be reimbursed for the construction of my experiment?

A: Participants are responsible for funding the construction and

design of their experiments.

Q: What is the allowed geometry/size of the experiment?

A: Maximum size of the experiment is 30x20x20 cm. There should be

no moving parts outside. The maximum weight is 10kg. There should be

no hazardous materials, and if liquids are present, the equipment

must be completely watertight.

Q: What are the interfaces to attach it to the zero-g airplane?

A: Experiments must be designed to be WEARABLE, as part of the

payload specialist’s clothing and will not be allowed to freely float

into the cockpit. They should be electrically autonomous.

Q: What is the exact duration?

A: The duration of free-fall is up to 10 parabolas of

up to 10 seconds each, for every flight participant.

Q: What is the g-profile during this duration?

A: The maximum g load is 3.5 g on pull-in and pull-out manoeuvres.

Real zero-g gravity between pull-in and pull-out.

Q: What kind of power and data acquisition units are available on board?

A: The experiment should not need any external components or electric plugs.

Q: Will there be travel and lodging provided?

A: Please note that lodging and travelling will be not sponsored.

Participants are responsible for lodging and travel to Spain,

and are encouraged to find sponsors for their experience.

Q: Are there any restrictions for who may apply?

A: Undergraduate, Master and PhD students from all over the

world are welcome, between 18-35 years of age. Team members

may be eligible to fly the experiment provided they have a currently

valid JAR/FAA Class II Medical Certificate. Final decision on whether

participants can accompany their experiments will be in hands of the pilot-in-command of the aerobatic plane.

Q: Who will be flying the aircraft?

A: The flight will be operated by Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell,

with an expert in zero-g parabolas aerobatic licensed pilot-in-command

and a payload specialist that will be on board of the aerobatic plane.

There is the possibility for the students to become the payload

specialist if they are interested. Medical and legal restrictions apply.

SELECTION PROCEDURE

Selection of the winning experiment will be objectively performed

by ELGRA members, leading experts in Low-Gravity research.

The European Low-Gravity Research Association (www.elgra.org)

is a leading research society in Europe which particularly

promotes the involvement of youngsters in space research.

Winning students will be encouraged to submit their results

to the ELGRA Symposium to take place in a city of Europe in 2015.

Results of this selection procedure will be final.

Aeronautical Medical Class II Certification required for flight

Please note that winning participants must obtain medical

documents (JAR, FAA Aeronautical Medical Class II Certificate or

any equivalent,  within the student’s country of origin) before flight,

that certify that they have no medical condition that impairs them

for flight. Medical certificates for flight crews are provided by

authorised medical examiners in every country where fight crew

regulations apply. Flight Certificates are only required if the

student wishes to fly the experiment. A medical check-out is

again required the weekend just before flight, by our own

Medical personnel. A certified Flight Surgeon from

SEMA (Spanish Society of Aeronautical Medicine) will supervise

the operations on-site. If the student does not pass the medical examination,

the winner team is still eligible for flying the experiment

(it will be flown by another qualified payload specialist from the organizing partners).

 

Legal disclaimer and other legal issues

Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell,

SGAC, ELGRA, EUROAVIA or any other person taking part

in the organization of this competition are not legally

responsible for the activities involved with the contest,

nor are they responsible for damages to the experiments

or persons on board or to third parties.

A limited-terms civil insurance from

Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell, expert medical advice and a

mandatory pre-flight briefing will be  provided to all flight participants.

 

Leave a comment

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Marte, la última frontera de la Curiosidad

Walter Cronkite

Cronkite fue uno de los periodistas estrella de la televisión estadounidense. Estuvo en todas. Y aún hoy es reconocido por los mayores como el rostro que transmitió la carrera espacial a los hogares. Algo así como el Jesús Hermida de Televisión Española.
Una de sus últimas apariciones públicas fue en la inauguración del Congreso Mundial del Espacio (Houston, 2002). A sus 85 años, y con toda una vida de reportero a sus espaldas, se dirigió a la audiencia y emocionado, agradeció haber tenido la oportunidad de narrar en directo “la más grande hazaña realizada nunca por la humanidad”: la llegada del hombre a la Luna.
La llegada de Colón a América o la llegada del Apolo XI a la luna son acontecimientos históricos que cambiaron nuestra percepción del mundo. Abrieron nuevas perspectivas y proporcionaron avances científicos y tecnológicos que mejoraron posteriormente nuestras vidas.
La pregunta es relevante. ¿Para qué vamos a ir a Marte habiendo tantos problemas aquí y ahora, en la Tierra?. Hay una respuesta y más que racional, es visionaria. Tiene parte de romanticismo y parte de audacia.
El espíritu explorador humano nunca ha cesado. Marte es el continente desconocido del siglo XV, o la luna del siglo XX. En el siglo XXI no hay otro lugar en el Universo suficientemente cercano que no hayamos explorado ya. Además está suficientemente lejos para poner el viaje a la altura de misterio y dificultad de los pioneros de la exploración. Nunca va a ser un viaje justificado económicamente, y será necesaria una gran voluntad política y económica para emprenderlo. Como los viajes de Colón al Nuevo Mundo.

El robot CURIOSIDAD (Curiosity en inglés) ha llegado a la superfície del planeta rojo gracias a una operación técnica extraordinariamente compleja. Para muchos, es un primer paso hacia la futura llegada de astronautas a Marte. Las misiones robóticas son la avanzadilla de la exploración en persona. Preparan el terreno, analizan si el terreno es habitable. Extraen muestras de la superfície y realizan con ellas experimentos científicos que nos permiten conocer mejor ese mundo extraño e inexplorado.
El espectáculo mediático que ha acompañado la llegada de este robot de la NASA me ha recordado a las sondas Viking. Por entonces, Joan Oró, un joven doctor catalán, hijo de panaderos, trabajaba en la Universidad de Houston. Pero retrodezcamos un poco. En 1964, cuando empezaba a desarrollarse el programa Apollo, se reunieron un centenar de científicos en Stanford, California para planificar la exploración del planeta Marte. En esa reunión participó el doctor Oró. Él propuso que las naves Viking, que debían posarse en suelo marciano, llevaran consigo un instrumento denominado cromatógrafo de gases, con el que había realizado su tesis doctoral. La propuesta fue aceptada, y junto con otros experimentos las naves Viking emprendieron viaje hacia Marte. Así fue que, con no poca polémica por el coste de la misión, la humanidad colocó su primer vehículo en Marte el dia 20 de julio de 1976, unos 46 años añtes aproximadamente que el hoy famoso robot Curiosidad. Una segunda nave llegó en septiembre. Uno de los experimentos del programa Viking consistía en analizar si había vida en el planeta rojo. Consistía en coger una muestra del planeta, tirarla en un recipiente de la propia Viking y someterla a reacción con unos productos reactivos. Los resultados iniciales dejaron estupefactos a los biólogos. La mezcla produjo una cantidad importante de dióxido de carbono marcado radioactivamente, lo cual no era ni más ni menos que una prueba experimental de la existencia de vida en la superfície de Marte. Los directivos de la Nasa hicieron pública la notícia desde el centro JPL de Pasadena (el mismo desde el cual se controla el robot Curiosidad).
Oró recuerda esos momentos en su biografía:
Cuando los biólogos empezaron a presentar los resultados todos nos quedamos boquiabiertos. Pero cuando mostraron la segunda diapositiva, con todos los ingredientes que habían intervenido en la mezcla reactiva, vi que el último de todos era ácido fórmico. Se me cayó el alma a los pies. Me di cuenta de que ese anuncio había sido un gran error. Yo sabía que aquéllo que se presentaba como un gran hallazgo no tenía nada que ver con la detección de vida, sino con un subproducto de las reacciones de oxidación del ácido fórmico. Lo había estudiado en mi tesis”.
A pesar de que la polémica científica continúa aún hoy día, el consenso posterior entre los científicos fue que la interpretación de Oró era válida. No podía descartarse la presencia de vida en Marte, pero tampoco afirmar que ésta se había descubierto experimentalmente. Y hasta hoy no hay datos suficientes ni concluyentes para decir que existe o que ha existido vida en la historia del planeta rojo. La duda persiste.
El robot Curiosidad no está dirigido directamente a responder esta pregunta, pero contiene gran cantidad de instrumentos que aumentarán nuestros conocimientos sobre Marte. Uno de ellos, un sensor de alta tecnología, ha sido desarrrollado en mi universidad, UPC Barcelona Tech.
Estemos preparados o no para nuevas sorpresas, la Curiosidad humana ha llegado a Marte para quedarse.


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JENUI 2012

En mal trance me pusistéis,
maese Miró, maese López,
pues no en balde para la ciencia nos encontramos,
y en la tierra del Quijote vinistéis.
!No fue sino en verso pardiez!
que ante la recatada audiencia
de doctos, sabios y acompañantes
vuestra ponencia recitásteis
en original forma y manera
cual Segismundo cualquiera
dejando atónita la concurrencia.
Este humilde caballero compostura tuvo
y tras vuesta brillante aparición
emprendió la grata tarea de apreciar vuestra idea
y con apalgartas y a bajo trote mi destino fue
no otra cosa que dirimir mi ciencia en prosa.

Tan grande fue la sesión
tan enorme el atrevimiento
que la cantan hoy los juglares
y en este enlace grabada quedó esta emoción.

Que todos los JENUI son sueños, y los sueños, sueños son.

Acceso a la grabación de la ponencia en verso de David López
y Joe Miró:
http://chico.inf-cr.uclm.es/mortega/2011/?p=1380

Web de las JENUI 2012 – Jornadas Nacionales de Enseñantes Universitarios de la Informática:
http://jenui2012.uclm.es/

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UPC experiments with zero gravity at Sabadell Airport

The winners of the first edition of the Barcelona Aerobatics Zero-Gravity Challenge, organized by the Aeronautics and Space Research Center (CRAE) at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya ‘BARCELONA TECH’ (UPC), have had the opportunity to test their experiments at the Sabadell Airport (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain) on Sunday, 31 October,2010.

The contest, led by Professor Antoni Pérez-Poch of the CRAE, challenged undergraduate and postgraduate students at the UPC to design and build a zero-gravity experiment in a limited amount of time.

The winner of this first edition of the contest was a project entitled “Perspective-Reversible Figures in Parabolic Flight,” developed by a team from the International Space University (ISU) led by microgravity research expert Gilles Clément of France. The other members of the team were Alexandra Kindrat, Heather Allaway and Alexander Melinyshyn of Canada, Jagruti Pankhania of the United Kingdom, and Jonathan Muller of France.

This contest was made possible by a collaboration agreement between the UPC, the flight school AeroClub Barcelona-Sabadell and the Barcelona Aeronautics and Space Association (BAIE). The second edition of the Barcelona Aerobatics Zero-Gravity Challenge will feature the participation of the Space Generation Advisory Council, an international association of students and young space professionals that advises the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA).

Platform for zero-gravity experimentation

Thanks to an agreement between the UPC and AeroClub Barcelona-Sabadell, the Sabadell Airport has become a platform for microgravity experimentation that is open to the European Low Gravity Research Association (ELGRA), as well as to university students. Since 2007, the airport has been the site of research led by Professor Pérez-Poch on the effects of zero gravity on the cardiovascular system.

This research, undertaken in collaboration with aerobatics pilot Daniel Ventura, has included the validation of NELME, a numerical model that simulates cardiovascular changes resulting from exposure to microgravity. It’s the first parabolic flight research campaign ever undertaken with single-engine planes.

Although single-engine airplanes offer shorter spurts of weightlessness—between five and eight seconds—these periods are long enough to allow experiments to be carried out under reduced gravity conditions.

The experiments carried out and the technologies being developed in this field have proved essential to our understanding of physical, chemical and physiological processes. One example is the discovery of a fundamental mechanism that helps to control the cells that produce red blood cells. This discovery stemmed from a study of “space anemia,” a common condition among astronauts.

Therefore, the Space Generation Advisory Council is organizing the Second Edition of the Barcelona Zero-G Challenge. Please stay tuned for more details! You can win the chance to fly your experiment in zero gravity in 2011!

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Siurells, pilots i controladors, la medicina aeronàutica

Siurell, una icona de Mallorca


Un siurell, com la ensaimada o els dimonis és un símbol de Mallorca. És una peça d’artesania típica de ses illes, que funciona com un xiulet. Petitet, a la base de la figura, es pot veure el bec. Doncs vet aquí que la Societat Espanyola de Medicina Aeronàutica (SEMA) ha tingut la gràcia de regalar-me el que veieu a la foto.
Hi ha una societat a Espanya per parlar de medicina aeronàutica? Sí. Són els especialistes en garantir la seguretat mèdic a bord dels avions, i de tot el que s’hagi d’enlairar.

Cada any celebren un simposi científic en algun lloc de l’estat i aquest any ha tocat Palma de Mallorca. No oblidem que AirEuropa hi té la seva base principal, i que és el quart aeroport més transitat de l’estat.
Doncs bé, resulta que ara estan d’actualiatt ja que són ells, els metges examinadors aeris els únics capacitats per donar la llicència mèdica per poder treballar als pilots, als tripulants de cabina, i … als controladors aeris. Cada col.lectiu ha de passar per una revisió mèdica exhaustiva per tal de ser habilitats per volar, o controlar l’espai aeri.

De fet, aquest simposi que va tenir lloc els dies 18 i 19 de novembre els serveix als metges aeronàutics espanyols com a curs d’actualització en la seva especialització.

Un simposi on es veuen diferents taules rodones i treballs de recerca en el camp per part, majoritàriament, de metges i investigadors de l’àmbit aeronàutic.

Aquest any vam veure per començar una bonica taula rodona sobre nous avenços en aquesta matèria. Entre d’altres, el Dr. Carlos Velasco, metge del CIMA (Centro de investigación en Medicina Aeronáutica, depenent del Ministeri de Defensa) va oferir una interessant introducció a les aeronauts no tripulades (UAVs) i els factors humans relacionats amb el seu control.
Al mateix matí, vaig tenir la sort de poder-hi presentar una plataforma innovadora i pionera d’experimentació en gravetat zero que hem engegat recentment entre la Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), l’Aeroclub Barcelona-Sabadell i BAIE, el clúster Barcelona Aeronàutica i de l’Espai.
Per la tarda, es van repassar temes de riscos laborals relacionats amb l’aviació, i la ja tradicional ronda de casos clínics. Sota el nom de ‘Volaria vostè amb aquest pilot’ es plantegen casos reals de pilots en diverses situacions que plantegen una diagnosi sobre si el pilot hauria de mantenir la seva llicència de vol o no.
Després, la Dra. Enriqueta Alomar, Presidenta de la Societat va presentar amb la seva habitual precisió les tècniques actuals de prevenció i diagnosi de les malaliteis del cor, aplicat a les revisions mèdiques aeronàutiques del personal en vol. La primera jornada es va cloure amb la tradicional actualització sobre la legislació vigent en matèria aeronùatica, la incidència en aquesta de l’Agència Estatal de Seguretat Aèria (AESA) i el debat conseqüent, com sempre, molt acalorat entre els assistents.

A l’Assembla General es va constatar la bona salut de la societat. Per ser una branca de la medicina que a Espanya no és reconeguda com a especialitat MIR déu n’hi do l’activitat que pot presentar.

La segona jornada va iniciar-se amb una nova taula rodona sobre la Desorientació espaial.
Acabada aquesta, es va donar pas a les comunicacions lliures. El Dr. Juan Carlos Laguardia, de la base aèria de Saragossa va oferir una panoràmica històrica del que han estat i són els sistemes de navigació, des de l’antiguitat fins als moderns sistemes depenents de satèl.lits.

En següent lloc, vaig poder tornar a intervenir, amb el projecte ACCESS MARS, una missió de referència original que planteja per primer cop l’ús de les coves naturals volcàniques existents a Mart com a hàbitat inicial. Els humans podrien, com van fer els nostres avantpassats a la Terra, accedir al planeta roig per primer cop, amagant-se a les coves que s’hi han descobert. Un projecte realitzat entre Nasa-Ames i el Nasa Exploration Directorate, com a part del programa d’estiu 2009 de la International Space University.

I després d’aquests temes tan dispars, el Dr Agustí Cabré, un català que és metge aeronàutic a la RAF, va fer la conferència de clausura amb el tema ‘Per què va morir Ícaro? Anàlisi del primer accident a la història de l’aviació’.

Un garbuix de temes ben interessants comprimits en dos jornades intenses.

Qui havia de pensar que els nous decrets que afecten la feina dels metges examinadors aeris en relació amb els controladors, serien motiu de tant rebombori unes poques setmanes després…

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